Dentist 17331 | 6 Harmful Habits That Affect Your Teeth

Dentist Hanover PA

Hanover DentistNearly everyone has at least one habit that they wish they could break. Did you know that some of them can affect your oral health? Here are a few common habits and tips for how to break them.

  1. Nail Biting

Why it’s harmful: Your dental health may suffer from nail biting by possibly chipping your teeth or impacting your tooth. You place pressure on your jaw when you leave it in a protruding position for long periods of time. You could also tear or damage your gums.

The solution: Some patients find it helpful to wear a mouth guard to deter form nail biting. Other ways to reduce nail biting include using therapy techniques, reducing stress, or applying bitter tasting nail polish.

  1. Brushing Too Hard

Why it’s harmful: It’s best to brush your teeth for two minutes at least twice a day. Make sure to not brush too hard since this can lead to damage to the teeth and gum irritation. When you brush too hard, you risk gum recession and not cleaning your teeth efficiently.

The solution: Instead of brushing hard, use a soft toothbrush and apply a proper pressure. Let your toothbrush bristles touch your gums at a 45 degree angle and reduce the force of your brush on your gums.

  1. Grinding and Clenching

Why it’s harmful: This can chip or crack your teeth as well as cause muscle tenderness and joint pain. You may also experience a painful sensation when chewing or inability to open your mouth wide.

The solution: Stay aware of your teeth grinding and clenching and use relaxation exercises to keep from doing both. A mouthguard can also help protect you from grinding your teeth while you sleep. This will reduce any tooth pain, or muscle soreness and give you a better sleep. Our dentist can provide recommendations for how to combat teeth grinding.

  1. Chewing Ice Cubes

Why it’s harmful: Tooth enamel and ice are both crystals. When you push two crystals against each other, it can cause one to break. This may be the ice and sometimes it may be the tooth.

The solution: Try drinking beverages without ice or use a straw instead.

  1. Constant Snacking

Why it’s harmful: If your diet consists heavily of sugary foods and drinks, you are at a higher risk of forming cavities. The cavity-causing bacteria feast on leftover food and produces acid that attacks the outer shell of your teeth.

The solution: To reduce snacking, eat balanced meals so that you can feel fuller, longer. You should avoid sugary foods when snacking. If you are tempted to eat the occasional sugary snack, just make sure to drink a glass of water after to wash away the leftover food.

  1. Using Your Teeth as a Tool

Why it’s harmful: Using your teeth as a tool to hold items, open bottles, cut through thread, or other functions can put you at risk for chipped or broken teeth or jaw injuries.

The solution: Your teeth should never be used to hold or open items or to cut things when you don’t have scissors at your disposal. Look for your scissors or find someone that can give you a hand. Your mouth will thank you for it and you’ll be saving yourself from potentially costly and painful dental complications.

Contact our office to schedule your next dental appointment.

214 Broadway Hanover, PA 17331

17331 Dentist | 12 Reasons to See Your Dentist

Dentist Hanover

Hanover, PA DentistDon’t wait until you’re in pain to see your dentist! Most people make time to clean out the house, car, garage, or closets at least twice a year. Why not include your oral health on your “to do” list?

Schedule an Appointment Now!

Regular professional cleaning and examinations are essential to maintaining optimal oral health. These routine visits are your first line of defense against tooth decay, periodontal disease, oral cancers, and more. Early identification and treatment of any oral illness improves outcomes and allows for less-invasive treatment options. Don’t wait until it hurts!

Why Do We Avoid Going?

The HDI institute, in a study done with the American Dental Association, lists some of the main reasons we sometimes delay going to the dentist. Cost, low perceived need, time, and anxiety are the most common causes. However, if we allow these concerns to interfere with oral care, we may allow more serious issues to develop.

When Should We See the Dentist?

The ADA or American Dental Society recommends maintaining twice yearly visits for cleaning and examinations. In addition, they advise making an appointment for any of the following concerns:

  1. Pain in your mouth, teeth, or face
  2. Injury to your mouth, teeth, or face
  3. Conditions that can affect oral health, such as diabetes
  4. Pregnancy
  5. Jaw pain or stiffness
  6. Bleeding, swelling, or redness in your gums
  7. Recent dental treatment, such as fillings, crowns, implants, or root canal
  8. Pain or difficulty eating or drinking
  9. Chronic dry mouth
  10. Smoking or tobacco use
  11. Sores in your mouth that are not healing
  12. You have questions or concerns about your oral health or hygiene

Our team is here to help you achieve and maintain your best oral health. To schedule your next appointment, please contact our office.

214 Broadway Hanover, PA 17331

Hanover Cosmetic Dentist | Chewing Gum for Your Oral Health

Dentist in Hanover, PA

17331 dentistDid you know your oral health can impact your overall health? We’ve compiled a list of 5 tidbits about your teeth and oral health.

Say Cheese

Cheese has been found to promote dental health by helping prevent tooth decay. The calcium and phosphorus found in cheese help neutralizes acid in the mouth. Acid can create dental erosion, which can cause decay that may require filling. Cheese creates a protective film around teeth and helps remineralize the enamel.

Keep Smiling

Your smile can make a difference. Studies have found that 50% of people consider a smile the first facial feature they notice. One study found that 88% of us remember people with beautiful smiles whenever we meet new people. This means attractive smiles are key to being more noticeable and remembered.

Toothbrush Time

Don’t forget to replace your toothbrush at least once every three months. You should get a new toothbrush after recovering from any sort of viral infection, flu, or cold. You are more likely to be re-infected if these bacteria implant themselves on the bristles.

You’re Unique

In your lifetime, you only get two sets of teeth— baby teeth and permanent teeth. It is important to take proper care of your permanent teeth. Did you know that no two people have precisely the same set of teeth? Your teeth are as unique as a fingerprint. This is the reason teeth are used by investigators for identification. Your tongue also has a unique print, though it is not commonly recorded.

F.Y.I on Floss

Floss is a lot more useful than you may think. If you skip out on your daily flossing, you can miss cleaning up to 40% of your tooth surfaces. Flossing can also help prevent gum disease by removing plaque near the gum line. Floss has other alternative creative uses. The next time you are looking for a fun holiday project, grab some dental floss and a handful of cereal to string for the tree. Floss works well for repairing a bead necklace too!

Contact our office today!

Cosmetic Dentist Hanover | Chewing Gum for Your Oral Health

Dentist in Hanover, PA

17331 dentistSugary, sticky, and sweet candies can damage your teeth by increasing your risk of decay. Though gum can be considered a type of candy, chewing sugarless gum approved by the ADA can actually help protect teeth and prevent tooth decay. Here’s what you need to know about gum and your teeth.

How it Works

Chewing gum helps increase the production of saliva. Chewing sugarless gum for twenty minutes following meals can help prevent tooth decay because the saliva helps wash away food and other debris from the surface of your teeth. Increased salivary flow can also neutralize acids that bacteria produce inside your mouth. Over time, acid can break down tooth enamel, leading to decay. Saliva contains calcium and phosphate, which aid in strengthening tooth enamel.

Look for the ADA Seal

The ADA Seal assures you that the gum is sugarless and has met the ADA’s criteria for safety and effectiveness. ADA-labeled products are tested to ensure they provide the benefits guaranteed by the seal. Companies must verify all relevant data with the ADA to become certified. If you are unable to brush for a short period of time, chewing gum with the ADA seal is a great option to help clean your teeth after a meal or snack.

Can I Stop Brushing if I Chew Gum?

No. Chewing gum for twenty minutes after a meal helps but is not a replacement for brushing and flossing. You should brush at least twice each day, for two full minutes. Chewing gum also does not eliminate your need for regular dental examinations. Our dentist recommends scheduling two visits each year, with additional visits necessary for high-risk patients with oral health conditions.

Chewing sugarless gum has noticeable benefits for your oral health, such as increasing the production of saliva. While this can help prevent the build up of decay-causing bacteria, chewing gum should not be used as a substitute for brushing or flossing. Our dentist recommends that if you are chewing gum, be sure to choose an ADA approved brand of sugarless gum.

Contact our office today!

Cosmetic Dentist Hanover | 8 Great Ways to Improve Your Smile

Dentist in Hanover, PA

17331 dentistWe all know the importance of making a great first impression. Whether you’re going into a job interview or about to go on your first date with someone new, you want to have the confidence that comes with a great smile. After years of wear and tear however, a lot of people end up with teeth that they’re not completely proud to show off. If you feel unhappy with the way your smile looks, don’t worry; there are plenty of options that can help.

Figuring out the best ways to improve your smile can be a daunting task, but our dental team is here to help, offering a range of services dedicated to helping you look and feel your best.

8 Ways to Improve Your Smile

  1. Teeth Whitening
  2. Dental Crowns
  3. Veneers
  4. Tooth Bonding
  5. Braces or Invisalign®
  6. Dental Implants
  7. Brushing and Flossing
  8. Regular Dental Visits

There are a myriad of ways you can improve your smile. Wether you decide to pursue a more in-depth treatment at our clinic or simply want advice on how to improve your oral health routine at home, our dentists are happy to help. Our highly trained team offers all the state of the art services necessary to help keep your mouth healthy and your smile shining bright.

It’s clear that there are a lot of treatments available for anyone looking to improve their smile. With options for any budget, there’s no reason to wait to begin your journey towards a better smile. To schedule a professional cleaning or to speak with someone about a personalized treatment plan, contact our office today!

Hanover Dentist | Oral Cancer Risk Factors

Dentist in Hanover, PA

hanover pa cosmetic dentistDuring a comprehensive dental examination, our team will look for signs of oral cancer. Early detection is key with oral cancer. If caught early, most forms of oral cancer are treatable. Our dental team is trained and educated to identify oral cancer.

Everyone is susceptible to the disease, but some groups of people are at a higher risk level than others. Here are the top seven risk factors for oral cancer.

Age

Are you in your mid 40s? Your risk of developing oral cancer increases with age. A noticeable increase is evident in people in their 40s and older. According to the Cancer Treatment Centers of America, the majority of diagnosed cases occur around the age of 62, but the average age is declining. The recent increase in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) related cases is causing more people to be diagnosed for oral cancers between the ages of 52 and 56. As the average age for oral cancer cases decreases, it is vital that you receive regular oral cancer screenings at any age.

Gender

Men are twice as likely to develop oral cancer compared to women. Part of this difference may be related to regular intake of alcohol and tobacco. According to the American Cancer Society, the gender difference is decreasing since more women are drinking and using tobacco today than in previous generations. There has also been a trend in recent years of younger men being diagnosed with HPV-related oral cancer. Both men and women should schedule regular oral health examinations to detect oral cancer early.

Tobacco

Smoking or chewing tobacco can greatly increase your risk of developing oral cancer. Tobacco can lead to cancer of the mouth or throat. Additionally, oral tobacco products cause cancers associated with the cheeks, gums, and inner surface of the lips. Development of these cancers depend on the duration and frequency of tobacco use. Non-smokers are not immune to oral cancer, so be sure to schedule an appointment with our team for an examination.

Alcohol

Among those that are diagnosed with oral cancer, about 70% of people are characterized as heavy drinkers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), heavy drinking is defined as having an average of two or more drinks per day for men, and one or more drinks per day for women. People who drink heavily can be more than twice as likely to develop oral cancers than people who do not drink. Oral cancer can still occur in people who have never had an alcoholic drink. Contact our team to schedule an examination.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

This sexually transmitted disease is associated with at least 10,000 cases of oral cancer diagnosed each year in the United States. People who have HPV-related oral cancers tend to be younger and are unlikely to smoke or drink. Typically, those diagnosed with HPV-related oral cancers are at a much lower risk of death or reoccurrence. We suggest a proactive approach by maintaining regular visits to our dental office.

Sunlight

People who work outside or with prolonged exposure to sunlight have a higher risk of developing lip cancer. It is vital to use UV protection when under the sun. Many lip balms offer UV protection. If you work outdoors frequently, schedule an additional examination with our team.

Diet

Poor nutrition can increase your risk for developing oral cancer. According to the American Dental Association, reports have shown that a link exists between diets low in fruits and vegetables and a higher risk for oral cancers. However, oral cancer can develop in healthy individuals. No matter your diet, schedule a visit with our team for a comprehensive oral examination.

Oral cancer does not discriminate. While these seven factors have been tied to an increased risk of oral cancer, that does not diminish the importance of regular oral examinations for everyone regardless of their age, gender, or other factors. Regular dental examinations make it possible for our team to detect oral cancer early. Contact our dentist to schedule a comprehensive oral examination.

Scare Away Tooth Decay

Dentist in Hanover PAHalloween is just around the corner, and everyone, both kids and adults, are excited to indulge in sweet treats. Although Trick-or-Treating may be a fun activity, don’t forget to consider the impact it has on your oral health.

As you check the candy loot, remove some of the following tooth decaying culprits from the stash:

  1. Candy Corn: This bite size candy seems harmless. However, some of us grab it by the handful. Candy corn contains a high amount of sugar and can often lead to tooth decay.   If you’re not careful, you could end up eating an entire bag.
  1. Chewy Sweets: Gummy candies and taffy can be difficult for children and adults to resist, but they are a serious source of tooth decay. It often gets stuck in the crevices between teeth, making it difficult to remove.
  1. Sour Treats: Sour candies, such as Warheads, Sour Patch Kids and Sour Skittles, have high acid levels that can break down tooth enamel quickly. The good news is that saliva slowly helps to restore the natural balance of acid in the mouth. It is recommended to wait 30 minutes to brush your teeth after consuming sour candies. Otherwise, you will be brushing acid onto more tooth surfaces, increasing erosive action.
  1. Hard Candy: Any candy that stays in your mouth for an extended period of time is more harmful for your teeth than candy that is quickly consumed. Examples of these candies include lollipops, Gobstobbers and Jolly Ranchers. Hard candy lowers the pH in your mouth, creating a more acidic environment that is more conducive to enamel erosion and decay.
  1. Caramel Chocolate: Candies, such as Milky Ways and Twix, contain caramel, a gooey substance that sticks to your teeth and is hard to rinse out when you get a drink or from the saliva in your mouth. That means that more harmful bacteria and acids grow, which put your teeth at an increased risk of decay.

By encouraging good oral hygiene, Halloween can be a fun, cavity-free holiday! If you forgot to schedule your last six-month check-up, now’s a good time to get back on track and contact us at Smiles on Broadway. We also encourage you to schedule an extra post-Halloween dental cleaning to ensure healthy teeth after eating all that candy!

Dr. Andrew Reese Received the AGD Fellowship Award

Dentist in HanoverContinuing a tradition of dedication to providing modern and high quality dental care, Dr. Andrew Reese received the Academy of General Dentistry’s Fellowship Award during the AGD 2015 annual meeting, which took place June 18 to 21 in San Francisco.

The AGD Fellowship Award is presented to dentists who seek to provide the highest quality dental care by remaining on the cutting edge of their profession. To earn this prestigious honor, Dr. Reese completed more than 500 hours of dental continuing education and passed a comprehensive written exam covering all aspects of dental medicine.

As a Fellowship Award recipient, Dr. Andrew Reese joins his father Dr. David Reese and approximately 6,000 dentists nationally who have gone above and beyond the basic requirements to care for their patients’ oral health.

“We are proud to honor Dr. Reese for his commitment in reaching this lofty goal,” says AGD Immediate Past President W. Carter Brown, DMD, FAGD. “He has distinguished himself professionally among his peers and is a role model for both his fellow dentists and the Hanover community.”

We feel this is important to share with you because we are proud to have patients like you that value their healthcare. We want you to know that we take very seriously our shared responsibility to offer you the best oral health care possible and we devote much time learning how to accomplish this. Thank you!

About the Academy of General Dentistry
The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) is a professional association of 39,000 general dentists dedicated to providing quality dental care and oral health education to the public. AGD members stay up-to-date in their profession through a commitment to continuing education. Founded in 1952, the AGD is the second largest dental association in the United States, and it is the only association that exclusively serves the needs and represents the interests of general dentists. A general dentist is the primary care provider for patients of all ages and is responsible for the diagnosis, treatment, management, and overall coordination of services related to patients’ oral health needs. For more information about the AGD, visit www.agd.org or www.knowyourteeth.com

Dental Office Screening Identifies Diabetes

Hanover DentistBy: Salynn Boyls of MedPage Today

Screening for diabetes during a dental office visit is feasible and may represent an effective strategy for identifying millions of Americans who are diabetic or pre-diabetic but don’t know it, researchers said here.

As many as 30% of the 29 million diabetics in the United States have not been diagnosed, and 90% of the estimated 86 million Americans with prediabetes are also unaware of their risk, Saleh Aldasouqi, MD, of Michigan State University, East Lansing, said at an afternoon media briefing from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologist’s 24th Annual Scientific and Clinical Conference.

Earlier in the day, Aldasouqi presented findings from a prospective study of 500 consecutive patients who completed a 14-question diabetes risk survey in their dentists’ office. The dental patients also agreed to have a finger stick blood draw to measure A1c levels.

None of the patients had a prior diagnosis of diabetes or pre-diabetes, and the screening revealed that 19.2% were pre-diabetic and 1.2% had diabetes.

“This was a cohort of patients attending a suburban dental practice who were more likely than the general population to see a physician regularly,” Aldasouqi said, adding that the diagnostic potential of dental-office screening would likely be much higher among populations who see a dentist more often than a doctor.

“60% to 70% of the population visits a dentist once or twice a year, and many of these people don’t have a family doctor,” he told MedPage Today. “I see great opportunity for screening (in the dental office setting).”

‘Dental Office Screening is The Future’

Susan Maples, DDS, developed the screening survey and conducted the screenings and finger stick blood draws at her private dental practice in Holt, Michigan.

Maple told MedPage Today that while very few dentists in the U.S. currently screen for any systemic disease, that is bound to change.

“I can tell you that only 1% to 2% of dental practices in the United States are doing anything right now regarding general health, but it is our future,” she said.

She added that the bidirectional relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease makes a strong case for dental office screening.

“Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to more severe, earlier onset periodontal disease with more complications and having periodontal disease makes it very hard for diabetics to achieve glycemic control,” she said.

The 500-patient study cohort included 302 women and 198 men over the age of 18, with a mean age of 48 years who were treated consecutively at Maples’ practice.

The 14-item survey asked responders to answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to questions designed to assess diabetes risk, including “Are you more than 10% above your ideal body weight,?” “Is your waist size over 35″ for women and 40″ for men,?” “Do you tend to be slow to heal from a cut or bruise,?” and “Do you experience experience inexplicable hunger, thirst or frequent urination?”

The survey also included questions about the use of hypertension medications and statins.

1 in 3 Americans Projected to Have Diabetes by 2050

Predictors of prediabetes or diabetes included older age, body weight 10% above normal, waist size about 40″ for men and 35″ for women, hypertension, abnormal lipid levels, tingling in the hands or feet and visual blurring, cataracts and glaucoma.

Maples noted that the projection by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that 1 in 3 Americans will be diabetic by 2050 makes the identification of better strategies for identifying patients with diabetes and prediabetes a huge priority.

“We are really talking about screening all adults, not just people with periodontal disease,” she said. “If we identify people when they are still in the pre-diabetes stage we can help them change behaviors and prevent diabetes.”

Aldasouqi said he became convinced of the potential of dental office diabetes screening to do just that during the course of the study.

“We hope this will be implemented in dental offices around the country,” he said, adding that identifying patients with pre-diabetes is essential because lifestyle modifications and pharmacotherapy can dramatically reduce diabetes risk.

Primary Source
American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists
Source Reference: Aldasouqui SA, et al “Diabetes detection in he dental office: A promising emerging opportunity for screening for undiagnosed prediabetes and diabetes” AACE 2015.